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20121206
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
of presidential power to union and civil rights leader who came to office after free elections in 1990. the commission's confirm the prosecutors fears. the body was found in the wrong grade. the identity of the body in his grave has yet to be revealed, but investigators say they know who it is. in the meantime, a second burial was held in warsaw. >> the family was not present when the body was identified. mistakes are always possible. i can only express my deepest sympathy with the family. now they have to cope with the exhumation and second burial. >> he does not have a clue. he lies morning, noon, and night. we are fed up with the allies. >> for the first time in years, the civic platform is the longer the strongest party. >> a mass grave would have been better. many of the dead were beyond recognition. a symbolic of what have been better. this is a very sensitive dispute for poland. it cannot be resolved discreetly. the politicians are using it for their purposes while the families suffer. >> some say one case may have been more painful than the others because the person in the wron
know, howard baker was everett dirkson's son-in-law. and during the run up to the civil rights bill, howard is sitting up in dirkson's office, phone rings, dirkson picks it up, says -- and all howard can say is him saying, mr. president, i just can't come down tonight, i was there last night. i was there the night before, i just got to go home. hangs up. 20 minutes passed, and he hears beagles barking in the hallway outside his office. and lbj walks in with his dogs. so because he wouldn't come down to see him, johnson called a car, got in and came up to just force a conversation with dirkson. >> and lyndon johnson -- >> and we got a bill. >> and by the way, l lyndon johnson. he's so detached and disconnected from the hill, he would call, mark haleprin, famously, subcommittee chairman in the house. and say, hey, i hear the mark-up didn't go very well today. do you need any help? what can i do? do you need me to call anybody? how can i push this along? again, we're not heaping all the blame on the president. let me underline again. >> yeah. >> john boehner's counter offer was patheti
to be the chair of the judiciary committee subcommittee on constitution and human rights and civil rights. we've had a series of hearings on the issues of human rights and laws in the united states that affect them. i've also been honored to join with senator cardin of maryland, who chairs our helsinki commission senate delegation on several trips overseas where he's made human rights a major part of the agenda of that commission and of the united states. that's why one of the aspects of this bill before us is so important. sadly today in russia, country of russia we are seeing evidence of brutal, horrific treatment of individuals and abuses of human rights. senator cardin, whom i said earlier is a great voice on human rights in the senate, introduced legislation in this congress that would impose u.s. visa bans and asset freezes on those who commit gross human rights violations around the world. that was the cardin amendment, which i thought was a good one. the idea was just sefrp. those who -- just simple. those who commit such acts shouldn't be allowed to visit our country. period. this ca
compliance with the legislation. laws such as the civil rights rs act, title 9, the family leave act strengthen our position. most importantly, i'm reminded of the veterans who have returned from the wars in iraq and afghanistan. the brave veterans who have served in all the places we have asked them to go, who have advanced the interests and ideals of the united states. we owe them a debt for their service. many of them have returned with severe wounds, some requiring lifetime care. and i'd like to just read a statement from one of the veterans that appeared in front of the foreign relations committee, a disabled attorney and veteran -- marine veteran john lancaster. and this is what he said. and i quote here. "in 1968 i arrived in vietnam in the tet ow offensive as an infay platoon commander. five months later i was shot and injured in a fire fight. after months of rehas been takers i arrived back home in western new york a disabled veteran. although my friends and family welcomed me home, society did not receive me quite as we will. while there is certainly tension around the poli
that many church-goers have changed their views about gay civil rights is one of the most underreported reasons why same-sex marriage is now legal in nine states. it is also one of the reasons that the constitution of prop 8 which took away gay californians right to marry. may get a hearing. the announcement was to be today. probably friday. a majority of main line protestants and roman catholics now favor legalizing same-sex marriage. did you know that? i knew a majority of americans. i did not know a majority of protestants and catholics favor marriage equality. >> that's awesome. >> stephanie: i was quite interested. >> thank you. >> stephanie: so when other more conservative christian kin claim it is against the bible we beg to differ. they wrote this in the "l.a. times," we posted this up on steph stephanie miller facebook. there are only three passages that deal with homosexuality in the new testament. the passages don't deal with homosexuality but with temple prostitution and other abuses. i'm
bomb in 1945. >> everybody has their own view of what happened. i do not want to argue civil rights with anybody in japan about the history. i think we are past that. my whole purpose for being here is to honor the dead, to listen to the living, and to see that this does not happen again. >> in washington, he discusses the inspiration for his trip and his meetings with bomb survivors. >> several governors met with president obama tuesday to discuss the soda ash called fiscal cliff and its impact on states and the economy. -- the so-called fiscal clef. members of the national governors' association spoke to reporters but the white house for about 15 minutes. >> good morning, everybody. i am the chair of the national governors' association, the governor of the telephone, -- of delaware, joined by the governor of oklahoma, the vice chair. and we are also joined by the governors of wisconsin and arkansas. we are three democrats and three republicans. we just had what i would say it was a very good meeting with the president. the issues we face as governors and states are considered as p
and opportunities for all. equality before the law and civil rights. that is a psychic -- a society in which i want to live and my children to be able to live in of. there is no guarantee we will live happily ever after. the era of globalization -- we need to cooperate more than ever to defend our democracy. and our society. we cannot take what has been achieved for granted. we need to continue fighting for it on a daily basis. other parts of the world are developing. i mentioned at the beginning of my speech that in the g-20 and with its creation, it took the necessary consequence to involved in emerging regions of the world and the political system to rule the world but those parts of the world we consider today that the emerging countries are not sharing our values. the lowest salary, the lowest respect for individual rights, the los respect for freedom of speech, for example by closing the internet. it the lowest standard of what the are considering you in the united states in europe as our basic values and our standards representing our basic values. the best means to compete economically agai
didn't always look like this. the original burned down during the civil war. workers rebuilt this one here in the 1600s. so let's take a stroll right through the gate. you have to go through this right here, this big wooden block, and on the other side you'll see a beautiful array of maple trees. and if you walk a little bit further across this path that you'll see, you'll actually find something completely different. beyond this you'll see something that is a little different. doesn't seem to quite fit with the rest of the temple, but that's what makes it so unique. along with traditional temple buildings, there's also a western-style aqueduct. the arched brick and granite waterway was built in the 19th century. people used it to transport water and goods to and from lake biwa in neighboring shiga prefecture. many protested its construction at the time because it is so drastically different from the rest of the temple. but now people say it fits right in. you can hear the water trickling through even today. and behind the aqueduct, you see the beautiful mountains right outside the ci
are profound for expanding civil society, for human rights, for addressing the needs of ordinary citizens, for building a greater economic certainty. rule of law is an essential pillar of our democracy. for china, rule of law is the best way of regulating and settling disputes in society. serving as a check against the abuse of power. the real question for china over the next few years will be, what reigns supreme for the world's second largest economy -- the party or the law? despite setbacks in recent years, wen jiabao said, rule of law will be one of three components of any future democracy along with dignity, justice, and independence as guarantees in any reform efforts. number 2, we have gone from the dais where jerry cohen was the only lawyer -- the days where jerry cohen was the only lawyer in china to 17,000 law firms. as away from -- as he weifang, there used to be only certain judges that held a bachelor's degree. too often china's justice system falls short of the laws on the books, both in practice and spirit. corruption is widespread. collusion among police and prosecutors an
, in syria's civil war. what happened? >> that's right, wolf. syrian activists say at least 45 people were killed in two car bombings outside the capital of damascus. that city has been a sanctuary for pro-regime forced to flee their homes. the rebels have claimed to down three fighter jets in the past 24 hours. we'll speak with cnn's arwa damon from northern syria later this hour. a federal judge is ordering tobacco companies to publicly admit they deceived americans about the dangers of smoking. the court ruled big tobacco should print on the box and advertisements. it's not clear if tobacco companies will appeal this decision. and the self-described king of motivation has died at the age of 86 years old. zig ziglar best known for his seminars and more than two dozen books on salesmanship. he died in dallas after getting pneumonia. he had quite an influence. he had 30 books or so over the course of his life. >> quite a following. thanks very much, lisa, for that. >>> republican raise eyebrows when he said he might break the anti-tax pledge. that statement could also draw him into getting
region on the brink of war? >> it is boiling. what we're witnessing right now is a series of civil wars. one is completely open in syria. as you mentioned there is the issue of chemical weapons. we could talk about that quickly. in libya the militia attacked us in benghazi. you have the unsettled situation in yemen. iran which is building its own weapons system and missile and penetrating iraq. in syria i may say the issue of chemical weapons is the most serious. yes, the regime is moving weapons away from the forces of the rebels but you don't know at what time the regime may use them. you don't know when al qaeda penetrating the rebels may seize some of these rebels. it is a very tense situation in syria. melissa: just so frightening. walid phares. thanks so much for joining us. >> thank you for having me. lori: rising tensions in the middle east, oil under pressure today. fox business contributor phil flynn of price futures group following all the action from the pits of the cme. why is not oil reacting more to the news out of egypt and for that matter syria, too? >> because the mark
's liberal constitutionalism. it's these documents. it's civil society. egypt seems to be going in the direction of not liberal democracy but illiberal democracy. >> right. you're absolutely right that people who are worried about egypt right now absolutely see it going in this illiberal direction. the constitution guarantees some individual rights, has great language about individual rights, but it makes it all subject to the sharia or principles of the sharia. >> the state is given charge of public morality. a loose open ended term. >> absolutely. women's rights, for example which there's been a constitutional article that said the state will work to achieve equality between men and women. as long as it doesn't violate principles of the sharia. that was in the constitution. now it's gone. now there's a nondiscrimination clause, but it doesn't mention women as a protected class. it is a step backwards in terms of liberties. if you believe what we care about when we look at democracy, we don't just care about the voting, it is important, we care about freedom and liberty for peo
said it. we were both sort of shaking but you were right. that's the good news. we have dick blumenthal with us, he'll be talking about the republican purfidy how they stopped the treaty protecting civil liberty liberty. great show coming up. >> cenk: thanks. we're looking forward to it. when we come back, the elbow of the day. that's always fun. [ ♪ theme music ♪ ] >> cenk: hunting deutsch was the job star in florida for governor rick scott. something we found out about him. he was taking unemployment before he got that job. now his job is to oversee people taking unemployment. from 2009 to may of 2011 he took unemployment. let me give you the specifics on that. he maxed out at $275 a week over 91 weeks. that's over $25,000 in government benefits. now if he really needed it, okay, fine. but it turns out he didn't. he had, for example home in santa rosa beach valued at $602,000. a condo in miami worth $500,000. he admits it. quote, at the end of the day i'm fortunate enough where i work for a very successful companies for a long period of time and luckily sold all my bank stocks and
to pay for the clean-up. right? >> that's right. they set aside a $20 billion fund voluntarily to compensate victims. there is also going to be additional penalties as part of civil violations of the clean water act, estimated to be 21 billion. >> that's probably going to be handed down in the next few months. this is just to settle criminal charges for the company pled guilty to 14 criminal guilty pleas, 11 counts 50 seaman's manslaughter, a criminal violation of the clean water act, a migratory bird act and for obstruction of justice, for submitting false information to the congressional investigation during the summer of 2010. >> the 20 billion clean-up fund the 21mul billion. >> for the clean water. >> billion? 41? so this criminal fine was? >> four and a half 689. >> >>. >> so $50,000,000,000. >> the company said aside all of that money. they had been selling off assets and they've got a huge cash reserve and the 20 billion for clean up that's in the fund. >> they can absorb this and stay in business? >> absolutely. >> that's been their plan.
worried about president morici sweeping it. that is more what the protests are about right now. ashley: what is the biggest danger, that this just dissolves into full-blown civil unrest? >> well, i think, even a bigger danger is the creeping of egyptian society. people are quite worried about it at this moment. it will actually prevent voters being informed on what is and isn't. ashley: expansion of powers for president morsi, kind of just voted himself into this position. is there anything that can be done about this? >> what the muslim brotherhood claims is that the last year and a half has been bad for society and bad for the economy. they need to get to this transition phase. get the constitution approved and get the country back to business. there are a lot of egyptian, so little social trust there right now. people are really fearful right now. ashley: this puts the u.s. in a bit of a difficult situation. there is a lot of money that comes to the united states to help the egyptian military. here we are, again, what does the u.s. do in this situation? it has to be a concern. >> ab
. it really doesn't matter what's going on with the economy. >> all right, we're going to leave it there. i hope you find some more entrepreneurs. appreciate it. >>> now switching gears, please listen to this. civil war and chemical weapons in syria and riots in egypt. the totalitarian regimes of saudi arabia, yemen and the list goes on, as you know, but guess what, the geniuses at the world bank think is the most pressing problem in the arab world today, global warming. a report yesterday from the world bank urges arab countries to ensure their national poli policies were "climate resili t resilient." good luck with that. you don't think they have other bigger fish to fry? the whole region is blowing up. global warming. world bank. anyway, question. how is the solid black vote for democrats hurt african-americans? we have a former nfl player and super bowl winner who says the answer is it's hurt them a lot. you don't want to miss this. he's next up. you know, one job or the other. the moment i could access the retirement plan, i just became firm about it -- "i'm done. i'm out of here." yo
, that the magnitsky act remain focused scairl and exclusively on russia. that's what russian democrats and civil society groups tell me they want right now. they want congress to send their government a message on human rights and by keeping the magnitsky act focused for now on russia we can do just that. furthermore, the administration can use its own executive authority at this time to apply similar kinds of pressures contained in the magnitsky act to human rights abusers in other countries. i for one will be watching closely to see if they do. for in many other cases are crying out for greater u.s. leadership on behalf of human rights. and if the administration does not take the initiative to apply the leverage at our disposal to these other cases beyond russia, that is the surest way to ensure that the congress will act to globalize the enact next year. there are still many people who look at the magnitsky act as anti--russia. i disagree. i believe it's pro-russia. believe it's pro-russia because this legislation is about the rule of law, and human rights, and accountability which are values
to the hospital. we are live at the breaking news desk. the new nears about chemical weapons in the civil war rocking syria, why the u.s. and the international community should be concerned. we'll go in-depth with ambassador bolton. jenna: right now we are learning about a serious health problem for a former child star, rick folbaum is live at the breaking news news desk with more. >> reporter: you don't usually hear about healthy 20 somethings having strokes. that's what doctors say happened to frankly m u.n. is. he was riding his motorcycle in phoenix when he lost vision in one eye. friends, including his fiancee got worried when he was acting very strangely. turns out he was having a mini stroke. here he is on "good morning america." >> something wasn't right. i knew i did not feel right. coy -pbt say words. couldn't say words. i thought i was saying them. my fiancee was looking at me like i was speaking a foreign language. maybe i had a bad headache, i don't know. i've never had a sip of alcohol in my life, i've never had any drugs, i've never even smoked a cigarette. i can't get a deep b
about the civil war in syria. we'll talk about the royal baby coming soon. first we want to get right to zoraida sambolin for an update on the day's top stories. >> soledad, the fiscal cliff debacle, with 28 days remaining before drastic tax hikes and spending cuts take effect, a republican spending plan has been rejected by the white house. brianna keilar is live from washington. what now, brianna? >> well, right now it's about the pressure building and the clock kicking, zoraida. as house republicans in the white house try to ultimately broker a deal between two very different plans. house speaker john boehner's counteroffer, if you take a look at the headlines from this $800 billion in what would be savings from tax reform. so that is new tax revenue. but not done by increasing income tax rate on the wealthiest. but instead by closing tax loopholes, eliminating tax credits. and also $600 billion in health savings. that's what you'd get from entitlement reform. from reforming medicare, and doing some cuts there under this plan. but compare it to the white house plan, very different
responsible for paying civil penalties. bill: late last night if you missed this, the senate voted to keep the terror suspects at gitmo right where they are. they will not come here if the senate has its way. the measure will block the transfer of detainees to u.s. soil. a day of at report identified facilities in the u.s. believed to be capable housing them. senators approved the measure, 54-41. general yak keen, jack keane, is flies to see you again. melissa: good morning, bill. bill: does this mean gitmo does not close not even in a second term or does the president come and veto this? melissa: there i think will be pressure to try to close it which doesn't make a lot of sense to me. we have enemy combatants in there as a result of a war. the frustration is the war has gone on for a long time and therefore we should do something about these detainees. we're not making the choice for the war going on a long time. the al qaeda and affiliates are making that choice. they just burned down our consulate and killed our ambassador and forced close sure of a cia base. they're protracking the wa
of the house? >> all right. >> all right. you guys are -- were you okay in the green room? nobody separated you two, did they? it was a civil? >> no, we get along. >> in the green room -- >> any bagels in there for you guys? >> no, we don't eat bagels. >> guys on monday got bagels. >> the bagels were there? >> it's all good. >> i judge what we think -- >> i'm jewish, when i walk into a room, i immediately know if there are bagels. >> did you get a tree? >> a holiday tree? >> yeah. >> you do? >> my wife says no, they're too messy. >> the christmas tree is the celebration of saturn, anybody could have a christmas tree. >> did you get a festivus pole? >> now you're talking. >> this is a family show. >> it's early. >> thank you very much, dan. we appreciate it. chris is sticking around. up next, we are half way through the holiday shopping season. we're going to look at the winners and losers after this. >>> and 7:40 eastern time, steven ross, looking to revitalize a major area of new york. we're going to talk business and football when he joins us in a few minutes. drum and flute" can look who's b
trafficing, women's rights, international terrorism, and more. no one nation can solve many of these problems alone. each one calls for a global network of partners -- government, businesses, international and regional organizations, academic institutions, civil society groups, even individuals, all working in concert. building those coalitions is one of the great task of american leadership. we rightly call america be indispensable nation because only the united states has the reach and resolve to rally disparate nations and peoples together to solve problems on a global scale. certainly in defense of our own interests, but also as a force for shared progress. our ability to connect is unparalleled. that, in the end, in the 21st century, is what leadership is about. diplomacy and development are not always glamorous. it is like what max weber said about politics -- the long, slow, drilling -- but it is the only way we'll be able to bring together the disparate and often conflicting interests to move forward in this interconnected world. here is one moment that captures this for me -- in dece
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)